Lability of Directional Tuning and Ocular Dominance of Complex Cells in the Cat’s Visual Cortex

  • P. Hammond
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 27)

Abstract

Directional specificity and ocular dominance for motion of bar stimuli against stationary textured backgrounds, and for motion of the same random texture alone, were assessed in 62 complex cells from the infragranular layers of the striate cortex in normal adult cats, lightly anesthetized with N2O/O2 and pentobarbitone.

Directional bias for preferred versus opposite directions of motion was enhanced with texture; two-thirds of cells directionally biased for bars were directionally selective for texture.

A majority of cells (52) showed substantial differences in preferred directions for bar and texture motion. Tuning for texture was typically broader than for bars; 22 cells showed bimodal tuning for texture, with depressed sensitivity in directions preferred for bars. Bar tuning was frequently broader on the flank of the tuning curve nearest the preferred direction for texture. Many cells, especially those with large receptive fields, were more responsive to texture than to bar motion.

Eleven cells showed interocular differences in sharpness and bias of directional tuning for texture; bar/texture tuning relationships were otherwise replicated in each eye.

Ocular dominance for bars and texture was compared in 31 cells; 14 showed stimulus-dependent shifts of up to three ocular dominance groups, with reversal of eye preference in three cases. There were no trends favoring ipsilateral or contralateral inputs, or increased binocularity for texture motion.

The results are interpreted as evidence that directional and orientational sensitivity are mediated by separate mechanisms, not necessarily in register for the two eyes.

Keywords

Depression Corti Bicuculline Amblyopia Pentobarbitone 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Hammond
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication & NeuroscienceUniversity of KeeleKeeleEngland

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