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Amorphous Semiconductors

  • William Paul

Abstract

In this brief series of lectures I should like to give you an account of the principal structural and electronic properties of amorphous semiconductors.

Keywords

Valence Band Chalcogenide Glass Dangling Bond Amorphous Semiconductor Antibonding State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Paul
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Applied SciencesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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