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Lipoproteins in Nutrition and Transport

  • Samuel Natelson
  • Ethan A. Natelson

Abstract

Before discussing the lipoproteins, it is necessary to identify the nature of the lipids being transported by these proteins.

Keywords

Cholesteryl Ester Lipoprotein Lipase Cholesterol Ester Free Cholesterol Plasma Lipoprotein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Selected Reading

Texts

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Review Articles

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Natelson
    • 1
  • Ethan A. Natelson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Practice, College of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.University of Texas Medical School and St. Joseph HospitalHoustonUSA

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