Advertisement

An Agenda for EFT Research

  • Kenneth L. Kraemer
  • Kent W. Colton
Part of the Applications of Modern Technology in Business book series (AMTB)

Abstract

Electronic funds transfer (EFT) systems have generated increasing publicity and debate in the United States in the past few years. On the one hand, EFT has been heralded as a promising innovation. Humes,(1) for example, notes that the early advocates of EFT, mainly technologists and financial experts, described a time when all stores, homes, banks, and businesses would be hooked into a massive computer network and money would be transferred electronically from account to account at the push of a button. The home-television screen and the Touch-Tone phone would make armchair shopping and financial dealing a common occurrence. Consumers would be freed from a host of bothersome tasks, the financial system would be more efficient, and when the computers weren’t busy transferring all that money, they would be available for inventory control, cash management, personnel administration, and many other management chores. Mundane tasks would be performed by computer, freeing clerical, retail, and even professional employees for bigger and better things. Jobs would become more satisfying to employees and organizations would become more profitable.

Keywords

Monetary Policy Financial Institution Credit Card Research Issue Payment System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    K. H. Humes, The checkless/cashless society? Don’t bank on it! The Futurist, 301–306 (October 1978).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Transcript of Panel Discussion on Monitoring EFT in Evolution, Moderator: J. F. Coates, E. B. Cox, and D. L. Reistad. Working Paper No. PPR-7725, Public Systems Evaluation, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (1976). (Chapter 18 of this volume is an edited version of the transcript.)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. R. Hiltz and Murray Turoff, More Inequality? An Exploration of Potential Impacts of EFT Upon Social Stratification in American Society, Working Paper No. PPR-7708, Public Systems Evaluation, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (1976). (Chapter 5 of this volume is an edited version of this report.)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. F. Horan, EFTS Outlook: Another View of the Forest, Working Paper no. PPR-7706, Public Systems Evaluation, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (1976).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Discussions by F. Leary Jr., K. O’Reilly and H. M. Palmer of papers by K. Humes and S. Hiltz and M. Turoff, Working Paper No. PPR-7709, Public Systems Evaluation, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (1976). (Chapters 4 and 5 of this volume are the Humes and Hiltz-Turoff papers referred to here.)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. Budd and E. Hamilton, The Economics of the Payments Mechanism, unpublished article (1976).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Arthur D. Little, Inc., The Consequences of Electronic Funds Transfer: A Technology Assessment of Movement Toward a Less Cash/Less Check Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1975).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. I. Boucher, A Comment on EFT Research: Five Tries and a Start, Working Paper No. PPR-7704, Public Systems Evaluation, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (1976).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth L. Kraemer
    • 1
  • Kent W. Colton
    • 2
  1. 1.University of California at IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Brigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

Personalised recommendations