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EFT as a Case of Technology and Public Policy

  • Kent W. Colton
  • Kenneth L. Kraemer
Part of the Applications of Modern Technology in Business book series (AMTB)

Abstract

It is increasingly recognized that large-scale technology is a two-edged sword: it has the potential for creating new opportunities and solutions to current problems, yet, left unattended, it may create new problems. As a result, public policy is being directed toward issues surrounding the development, diffusion, and impact of specific technologies as they evolve within society. These issues generally relate to an area of fact or policy of substantial concern, either because the potential impacts of the technology are unknown or because actions must be taken which will harm some and benefit others. Given this situation, research is becoming increasingly important for developing inputs for public policy regarding the current and potential impacts of proposed actions. The need for such research is especially felt with large-scale technologies which involve sophisticated equipment, require substantial investment, evoke broad application, and generate complex societal impacts.

Keywords

Financial Institution Payment System National Commission White Collar Crime Fund Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    K. H. Humes, The cashless/checkless society? Don’t bank on it! The Futurist, pp. 301–306 (October, 1978).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    National Commission on Electronic Fund Transfers, EFT in the United Policy Recommendations and the Public Interest, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. (1977).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    National Commission on Electronic Fund Transfers, A Progress Report to the President and to Congress, Programs, Plans and Accomplishments of the National Commission on Electronic Fund Transfers, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. (1976).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kent W. Colton
    • 1
  • Kenneth L. Kraemer
    • 2
  1. 1.Brigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  2. 2.University of California at IrvineIrvineUSA

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