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The Father-Daughter Relationship: Past, Present, and Future

  • Michael E. Lamb
  • Margaret Tresch Owen
  • Lindsay Chase-Lansdale
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO, volume 2)

Abstract

Among laypersons, theorists, and researchers, fathers have long been the forgotten parents and daughters the forgotten offspring. Despite the recently awakened interest in both father-child relationships and the development of femininity, these two trends have not converged to yield a substantive literature on fathers and daughters. Fathers and sons have held center stage in the literature concerning paternal influences on children, and the feminists who have provoked the interest in women’s issues have viewed men as lovers and oppressors, but seldom as fathers. Their failure to consider the father’s role in the development of femininity is unfortunate, for the limited evidence suggests that the father’s role may be both important and (from a feminist perspective) deleterious. The research that we review in this chapter indicates that fathers have, for the most part, regarded their daughters as the responsibilities of their wives. To the extent that they take an interest in their daughters’ development, their concern has been with the attainment and maintenance of conformity to traditional sex roles. For their own good, fathers believe, girls must learn their place in the world and beware of being overly assertive or competent lest they make themselves unattractive marriage prospects.

Keywords

Observational Learning Father Absence Paternal Behavior Feminine Behavior Paternal Warmth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Lamb
    • 1
  • Margaret Tresch Owen
    • 1
  • Lindsay Chase-Lansdale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Center for Human Growth and DevelopmentUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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