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Nutrition and Women: Facts and Faddism

  • Charlotte Neumann
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO, volume 2)

Abstract

Women are one of the most nutritionally vulnerable or high-risk groups, particularly during adolescence, childbearing, and nurturing years (Lowenstein, 1977). For the woman, nutritional risk, in its broad- est sense, goes back to her intrauterine existence and infancy. Evi- dence is now amassing to show that her growing years, adult develop- ment, and reproductive experience and outcome are modified by nutritional experiences early in life (World Health Organization, 1961).

Keywords

Folic Acid American Woman Adolescent Girl Nutritional Risk Royal Jelly 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte Neumann
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Public Health and PediatricsUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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