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“On the Road to Find Out”: The Role Music Plays in Adolescent Development

  • Julie Marks
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO, volume 2)

Abstract

Andrew Saltoun, an 18th-century Scot, claimed, “I care not who makes the nation’s laws, so long as I can make its songs” (as cited in Gleason, 1970). This statement implies that music is a potent vehicle of communication and can be influential in shaping attitudes and lifestyles. I share this view and along with other investigators (Horrocks, 1962; Rosenstone, 1969; Gleason, 1970) have increasingly developed the opinion that music has a very significant impact on adolescent behavior. Adolescents are in a fluid and impressionable stage of life and look to cultural avenues for information about themselves and their society. In light of this, I have been surprised that the adolescent experience has not traditionally been addressed in popular music. The absence of teenage music was most conspicuous after World War II as a youth culture emerged. The Depression and the war had ended, an age of affluence started, and adolescents appeared as visible and important consumers.

Keywords

Early Adolescence Adolescent Development Adolescent Group Popular Music Music Preference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Marks
    • 1
  1. 1.Los AngelesUSA

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