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Effects of Observed Violence on Females: A Critical Review

  • Susan H. Franzblau
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO, volume 2)

Abstract

Beginning with the work of social learning theorists in the early 1960s (e.g., Bandura, 1963, 1965; Bandura, Ross, and Ross, 1965), and culminating with the publication of the Report of the Scientific Advisory Committee on Television and Social Behavior in 1972, the issue of televised violence and its effects on children had grown into a widely researched and provocative area of study. Examples of research efforts are abundant. Topographically, Bandura reported that children imitate exactly the behavior they see (1963, 1965). Also, children recall (acquire) direct acts of aggression for long periods of time (Hicks, 1965). Notions about the general disinhibition (facilitation) effects of violence have also been studied: Longitudinal studies show that children grow more accepting of violence as a function of increased viewing (e.g., Dominick and Greenberg, 1972), and experimental studies have shown lowered sensitivity to aggression (Drabman and Thomas, 1974) and decreases in helping behavior (Hapkiewicz and Roden, 1971).

Keywords

Government Printing Galvanic Skin Response Observational Learning Aggressive Response Experimental Social Psychology 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan H. Franzblau
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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