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The Hallucinogens, PCP, and Related Drugs

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Both marijuana and the hallucinogens produce a change in the level of consciousness, and both are capable of inducing hallucinations. However, in the usual doses taken, the predominant effect of cannabis is to alter the “feeling state” without frank hallucinations, whereas the drugs discussed in this chapter produce abnormal sensory inputs of a predominantly visual nature (illusions or hallucinations) even at low doses.

Keywords

Toxic Reaction Related Drug Organic Brain Syndrome Lysergic Acid Diethylamide Psychotic Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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