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Alcoholism: An Introduction

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine are the most widely used drugs in Western civilization, with alcohol the most potent and destructive of the three. Probably reflecting this, there is a great deal of information available on the epidemiology, the natural history, and the treatment of alcohol-related disorders; thus, this drug is used as a prototype for the discussion of other pharmacologic agents. Information on alcohol is presented in two chapters, with Chapter 3 covering the pharmacology of alcohol, definitional problems surrounding this drug, the epidemiology of drinking patterns and problems, the natural history of alcoholism, and some data on etiology. Chapter 4 is an overview of treatment.

Keywords

Drinking Pattern Life Problem Organic Brain Syndrome Etiologic Theory Labile Mood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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