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The CNS Depressants

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

The central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs include a variety of medications, such as hypnotics, antianxiety drugs (also called minor tranquilizers), and alcohol. The general anesthetics will not be discussed here, as time and space constraints force me to limit the discussion to the substances most clinically important in drug abuse. One anesthetic agent, phencyclidine (PCP), is abused as a hallucinogen and is discussed in Section 8.3.

Keywords

Toxicologic Screen Central Nervous System Depressant Depressant Drug Central Nervous System Stimulant Minor Tranquilizer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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