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Migraine Headaches

  • William J. Ray
  • James M. Raczynski
  • Todd Rogers
  • William H. Kimball

Abstract

Although migraine headaches are less prevalent than tension headaches, patients suffering from migraines report that the pain is more severe and may be associated with nausea or other physical complaints. The pulsatile pain is usually located on one side of the forehead and appears to be the consequence of dilation in the superficial temporal arteries. Although there is debate as to the cause of migraine, the vascular locus of the pain is readily apparent, as the forehead blood vessels may protrude during migraine attacks (Dalessio, 1972). Migraines are generally treated with prescription medications, particularly ergotamine tartrate, a vasoconstrictor. Drug treatment is successful for many individuals, but pharmacological agents do not work in all cases and may cause severe side effects for some patients (Diamond & Furlong, 1976).

Keywords

Migraine Headache Superficial Temporal Artery Nonspecific Factor Headache Symptom Biofeedback Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Ray
    • 1
  • James M. Raczynski
    • 1
  • Todd Rogers
    • 1
  • William H. Kimball
    • 1
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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