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Modern Chromatographic Methods for the Identification and Quantification of Plant Growth Regulators and Their Application to Studies of the Changes in Hormonal Substances in Winter Wheat During Acclimation to Cold Stress Conditions

  • Frank Wightman
Part of the Nato Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 22)

Abstract

The early development and recent use of gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of growth regulators in plant extracts is reviewed in this paper. It will be shown how recent improvements in both GLC and HPLC procedures which give excellent separation of the different growth regulators in ether, ethyl acetate, and butanol extracts, when combined wherever possible with the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for conclusive identification of each growth regulator, now provide plant physiologists with modern techniques for carrying out rapid qualitative and quantitative analyses of the growth regulators found in extracts from plants taken at different stages in their growth and development, or at different stages in their response to changing environmental conditions. In a final section of the paper, the application of analytical GLC techniques to studies of the changes in growth regulating substances in two varieties of winter wheat during acclimation of the tissues to cold temperature conditions will be described.

Keywords

Cold Hardiness Zeatin Riboside Zeatin Riboside Plant Growth Substance Crown Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Wightman
    • 1
  1. 1.Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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