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Chemical Plant Growth Regulation in World Agriculture

  • R. W. F. Hardy
Part of the Nato Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 22)

Abstract

The tremendous increases in world crop production during the past twenty-five years were made possible by a system in which agrichemicals as fertilizers and plant protectant chemicals were most important components, while plant growth regulator chemicals were of little significance. This presentation will offer an optimistic view of the future opportunity for plant growth regulators. By 2000 A.D. I predict that plant growth regulators primarily as yield enhancers, but secondarily as quality improvers and production process facilitators, will become as important as fertilizers or plant protectant chemicals for world crop production. Specific topics included in this presentation are:
  1. (1)

    Strategies for increasing crop production for food, feed, energy, and materials including the relatively undeveloped technology of plant growth regulators.

     
  2. (2)

    The current status of plant growth regulators, reasons for their relatively slow development, and their advantages and disadvantages.

     
  3. (3)

    Steps in a fundamentally based approach to increase crop production with a tabulation of the many possible limitations or “what’s wrong” with two key biological processes—photosynthetic CO2 fixation and N2 fixation.

     
  4. (4)

    Specific biochemical, physiological, genetic, and agronomic targets for plant growth regulators will be suggested with a comprehensive tabulation of existing chemicals useful as experimental probes or as commercial plant growth regulators, and

     
  5. (5)

    Scientific highlights of selected promising areas for increased crop production including N2 fixation, photosynthesis, translocation, assimilate partitioning, protection from stress due to air pollutants, and hormonal activity manipulation.

     

Keywords

Nitrogen Fixation Crop Production Plant Growth Regulator Flag Leaf Nitrogen Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Appendix 2. Publications in Which Plant Growth Regulators Are Discussed

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  2. 2.
    Leopold, A. C., and Kriedemann, P. E., 1975, “Chemical Modification of Plants in Plant Growth and Development,” 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York.Google Scholar
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  5. 5.
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  6. 6.
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  12. 12.
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. F. Hardy
    • 1
  1. 1.E. I. du Pont de Nemours and CompanyWilmingtonUSA

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