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A Systematic Approach to Glass Cleaning

  • P. B. Adams

Abstract

The rational design of a cleaning process for glass includes a definition of the soil to be removed, an awareness of the alternative methods available for removing dirt, and an understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between the soil, the glass and the cleaning materials. This discussion focuses on the interactions that occur between the glass and the cleaning materials. The glass surface must be understood; it is not necessarily characterized by the bulk glass. Aqueous cleansers react with the surface in much the same way as do other acqueous solvents. Chemical interactions are either of an etching character, as with alkaline cleansers; or leaching character, as with acidic cleansers. The action of detergents on glass can be severe since they are compounded from various aggressive chemicals; certain additives may mitigate some of the harmful effects on glass. In general, non-acqueous solvents affect glass the least; they may be difficult to remove however. Mechanical cleaning steps may damage the surface.

Keywords

Glass Surface Cleaning Process Proceeding Volume Bulk Glass Aqueous Solvent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. B. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Corning Glass WorksCorningUSA

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