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Kerr Constants of Naturally-Occurring α-Amino Acids in Aqueous Solution

  • M. S. Beevers
  • G. Khanarian
  • W. J. Moore

Abstract

The electro-optical Kerr constants of equeous solutions of some naturally-occuring L-α-amino acids have been measured. The Kerr effect technique is well able to discriminate between solutions of different amino acids despite the relatively small differences between their dielectric constant increments. L-valine and L-isoleucine, whose structures are very similar, have Kerr constant increments of 3.6 and 2.28, respectively.

Keywords

Kerr Effect High Voltage Pulse Electric Moment Transient Recorder Leucine Isoleucine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Beevers
    • 1
  • G. Khanarian
    • 1
  • W. J. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ChemistryUniversity of SydneyAustralia

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