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Polarisability Anisotropy as an Indicator of the Effects of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics on Sensitive, Dependent and Resistant Strains of E.coli

  • V. J. Morris
  • B. R. Jennings
  • N. J. Pearson
  • F. O’Grady

Abstract

Using high frequency, low amplitude pulsed electric fields, the anisotropy of the electrical polarisability (△α) of E.coli bacteria may be evaluated from scattered light intensity changes. △α has been found to be very sensitive to the addition of antibiotics to aqueous E.coli suspensions. With increasing antibiotic concentration △α decreases in a manner reminiscent of an adsorption isotherm. Illustrative data on the interaction of aminoglycoside antibiotics with a sensitive, a dependent and two resistant strains of E.coli K 12 is presented and discussed.

Keywords

Resistant Strain Electrical Polarisability Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Bacterial Surface Particle Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. J. Morris
    • 1
  • B. R. Jennings
    • 1
  • N. J. Pearson
    • 2
  • F. O’Grady
    • 2
  1. 1.Electro-Optics Group, Physics DepartmentBrunel UniversityUxbridge, MiddlesexUK
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology, Queen’s Medical Centre, University HospitalUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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