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Fiber Optics pp 565-609 | Cite as

Semiconductor Light Sources for Fiber Optical Communication

  • H. Kressel

Abstract

The laser diode and the more familiar light-emitting diode (LED) are similar in that both consist basically of a p-n junction in which radiative recombination occurs under forward bias by the injection of carriers into a suitably designed region of the diode. Large differences exist, however, in the specific device design and materials needed to obtain efficient lasing at room temperature. This chapter will be concerned mostly with GaAs and AlGaAs heterojunction diodes in which the most efficient diode operation has been obtained at room temperature, including CW laser operation with the emission of tens of milliwatts of power. These diodes emit radiation in the 8000–9000 Å spectral region, depending on the alloy composition, a region well-suited for low loss (<10 dB/km) optical fibers. A second favorable transmission window is the 1.0 to 1.2 µm spectral range which requires alloys of InGaAs, InAsP, InGaAsP or similar low band-gap alloys. Reduced fiber attenuation and pulse dispersion are obtained at these longer wavelengths.

Keywords

Internal Quantum Efficiency Minority Carrier Lifetime Threshold Current Density Recombination Region Heterojunction Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

I. INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL TO RADIATIVE PROCESS AND DEVICES

  1. A. Yariv, Quantum Electronics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1975.Google Scholar
  2. J. I. Pankove, Optical Processes in Semiconductors, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, ‘1971.Google Scholar
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II. SEMICONDUCTOR LASERS WITH EMPHASIS ON HETERO-JUNCTION DEVICES

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  7. R. Wolf, Ed., Vol. 4, Academic Press, New York, 1974.Google Scholar

III. REVIEW OF MATERIALS RELEVANT TO LEDs AND LASER DIODES

  1. H. Kressel and H. Nelson, “Properties and Applications of III-V Compound Films Deposited by Liquid Phase Epitaxy” in Physics of Thin Films, Vol. 7, Academic Press, New York, 1973.Google Scholar

IV. NOISE PROPERTIES OF LEDs

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V. REVIEW OF GRADUAL DEGRADATION PHENOMENA

  1. H. Kressel and H. F. Lockwood, J. de Physique C3, Suppl. 35, 223 (1973).Google Scholar

VI. USER-ORIENTED PAPERBACKS

  1. R. W. Campbell and F. M. Mims III, Semiconductor Diode Lasers, Howard W. Sams and Co., Inc., Indianapolis, 1972.Google Scholar
  2. F. M. Mims III, Light-Beam Communications, Howard H. Sams and Co., Inc., Indianapolis, 1975.Google Scholar

VII. INTRODUCTION TO OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS

  1. Fundamentals of Optical Fiber Communications, ed. by M. K. Barnoski, Academic Press, New York, 1976.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kressel
    • 1
  1. 1.RCA LaboratoriesPrincetonUSA

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