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Analytical Techniques for the Prediction of the Fiber Forming Process

  • George A. Brown

Abstract

During the past fifteen years progress in the development of analytical techniques for the prediction of the glass fiber forming process has been significant. However, many challenging analytical and experimental problems remain unanswered in the production processes for fiber optics materials, single crystals and textile and insulation fibers. Formation of glass fibers by a drawing or extrusion process involves the flow of a fluid from a reservoir containing molten glass and through a suitably shaped passage. At the exit of the passage, the fluid then moves in a free-surface jet flow configuration through the surrounding atmosphere. The flow is produced by a combination of a reservoir pressure and tension applied to the jet (fiber) by a winding device on which the fiber is wound. At the temperatures of interest, the dominant forces are the viscous forces, the surface tension forces and the tension forces applied to the fiber. In certain viscous jet flow situations, the air shear forces, acting on the external surface of the jet, and gravity forces may be important. From a heat transfer viewpoint both radiant and conduction heat-transfer mechanisms within the glass are important. Convective heat transfer is important at the jet surface. Variations of thermodynamic and transport properties with temperature must be included in the analysis and radiative transfer properties must be known. Once the fluid reaches the free-surface flow region, a developing flow field is encountered in which two- or three-dimensional flow effects are important. This flow region is generally followed by a one-dimensional flow region. The characteristics of the fiber forming process can be predicted by solution of the governing physical equations with proper boundary conditions if data on the important properties are known. Results are presented to illustrate present agreement between experimental data and analytical predictions.

Keywords

Ambient Fluid Finite Difference Grid Nozzle Exit Plane Fiber Profile Ambient Shear Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • George A. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

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