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Educational Outcomes and Nutrition

  • Selma J. Mushkin
  • Ernesto Pollitt

Abstract

Educational outcome measurements are a guide to the allocation of resources for formal and, nonformal learning. In the developing world they serve as well as input data in assessing the developmental impact of resource commitments to education. In the first instance the outcome measures serve the economist’s efficiency purpose; in the second they serve an economic growth purpose.

Keywords

Educational Outcome Nutritional Deficiency Educational Process Severe Malnutrition Malnourished Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Selma J. Mushkin
    • 1
  • Ernesto Pollitt
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Georgetown UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of Population Studies, School of Public HealthUniversity of TexasHoustonUSA

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