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The Economic Theory of the Household and Impact Measurement of Nutrition and Related Health Programs

  • Dov Chernichovsky
  • Sebastián Piñera

Abstract

As a theory of choice, household economics offers a conceptual framework in which to investigate the family’s responses to changes in its environment. This framework can be useful for policy-makers and planners in formulating hypotheses about the effects of intervention programs. Econometrics, the complementary statistical extension of economic theory, furnishes a versatile statistical framework for testing these hypotheses and quantifying the effects of such programs, as well as increasing our basic knowledge about the interactions between the program and their social environments.

Keywords

Household Characteristic Child Weight Caloric Consumption Program Impact Program Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dov Chernichovsky
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sebastián Piñera
    • 3
  1. 1.The World BankUSA
  2. 2.Medical, Economics, Health & Welfare AdministrationBeershevaIsrael
  3. 3.Comisión Económica para America Latina (ECLA)SantiagoChile

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