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Feasibility of NMR Zeugmatographic Imaging of the Heart and Lungs

  • P. C. Lauterbur

Abstract

Image formation by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) zeugmatography is accomplished by placing an object in a magnetic field and subjecting it to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. The magnetic field may be considered to be composed of a constant uniform field and a smaller adjustable field that varies across the object. Atomic nuclei with magnetic moments, such as the protons in water and organic substances, bring about a resonant absorption of radiofrequency energy at a sharply defined frequency proportional to the strength of the magnetic field at each point within the object. The small non-uniform component of the field may be altered so that each part of the object has a different magnetic history, and the corresponding slight differences in the NMR resonance frequencies can be used to construct a 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional image of the distribution of the resonant nuclei within the object.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Image Formation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Signal Solid State Phys Green Pepper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© United Engineering Trustees 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. C. Lauterbur
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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