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Late Positive Component (LPC) and CNV during Processing of Linguistic Information

  • H. Goto
  • T. Adachi
  • T. Utsunomiya
  • I.-C. Chen
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 9)

Abstract

The late positive component of the evoked potential (LPC) and the contingent negative variation (CNV) have been investigated with visual and acoustic stimuli by many researchers studying linguistic processing. CNVs were investigated during word category discrimination by Burian et al. (1972). LPCs were studied during information processing in sentences by Friedman et al. (1975) and during semantic information processing of words by Thatcher and April (1976). Different lateralization for noun- and verb-evoked EEG scalp potential fields was reported by Brown and Lehmann (1977). Both Burian and Thatcher tried to apply ERPs evoked by words in testing aphasic patients. We studied CNV and LPC during processing of linguistic information to find out if ERPs can be useful for testing the recognition of Japanese sentences and words.

Keywords

Light Emit Diode P650 Amplitude P300 Latency Contingent Negative Variation Meaningful Sentence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Goto
    • 1
  • T. Adachi
    • 1
  • T. Utsunomiya
    • 1
  • I.-C. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineTokyo Metropolitan Police HospitalTokyo 102Japan

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