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Spatial Distribution of Sensory Evoked Potentials in Psychiatric Disorders

  • C. Shagass
  • R. A. Roemer
  • J. J. Straumanis
  • M. Amadeo
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 9)

Abstract

The topographic dimension has received little attention in evoked potential (EP) investigations of psychiatric patients. Although EPS have been recorded most often from a single lead derivation, some studies involving recordings from more than one site have yielded findings which suggest that the spatial distribution of EPs may be of psychiatric interest. For example, Rodin et al. (1968) in a study of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) observed that assessments of psychopathology in schizophrenics were more often correlated with right than with left hemisphere VEP characteristics. Perris (1974) found that amplitudes of VEPs from the left occiput were lower than those from the right in psychotic depressives while they were ill. Buchsbaum et al. (1977) reported that, in a rapidly cycling manic-depressive patient, a VEP wave was decreased in amplitude at the vertex and increased at the occiput with mania and conversely with depression. Such observations encourage further exploration of EP topography with respect to possible psychiatric correlates.

Keywords

Median Nerve Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Mean Amplitude Evoke Potential Nerve Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Shagass
    • 1
  • R. A. Roemer
    • 1
  • J. J. Straumanis
    • 1
  • M. Amadeo
    • 1
  1. 1.Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric InstituteTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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