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The Effects of Methylphenidate Dosage on the Visual Event Related Potential of Hyperactive Children

  • R. Halliday
  • E. Callaway
  • J. Rosenthal
  • H. Naylor
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 9)

Abstract

Hyperkinetic children have a disorder of attention, and that disorder can be reduced by giving stimulant drugs (Barkley, 1977). Unfortunately, the process of attention itself remains something of a mystery. So, naturally both the disorder of attention in hyperkinesis and the beneficial effects of stimulants are also unclear. The sensory ERP reveals something of the sequence of brain operations that follow a stimulus and thus provides a temporal dissection of operations potentially involved in attention. We have been employing ERP to study the interaction of attention and stimulants in hyperkinetic children in the hope of clarifying the nature of attention, its disorder in hyperkinesis and the effect of the stimulant methylphenidate.

Keywords

Visual Evoke Potential P228 Amplitude N159 Amplitude N159 Latency Hyperactive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Halliday
    • 1
  • E. Callaway
    • 1
  • J. Rosenthal
    • 1
  • H. Naylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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