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Valence Bond Theory of Partly-Filled Conductors

  • Z. G. Soos
  • S. Mazumdar
  • T. T. P. Cheung
Part of the Nato Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 1)

Abstract

The presently known1,2 π-molecular conductors share important common features. They all contain segregated stacks... AAA... of anion radicals and/or... DDD... of cation radicals, as illustrated by A = TCNQ, (tetracyanoquinodimethane) and D = TTF (tetrathiofulvalene). They all crystallize with a single molecule per unit cell along the stack, or high conductivity, axis. They all have partial charge transfer, or γ < 1, in contrast2 to the semiconducting simple salts based on D+ or A- stacks. They are narrow-band systems, with 4t ~ 0.5 eV and π-electron overlaps along the stack of 3.1 – 3.5 Å, or just shorter than the van der Waals separation. These common features, rather than differences in low-temperature phases, must guide the development of theoretical models.

Keywords

Hubbard Model Valence Bond Local Neutrality Organic Conductor Partial Charge Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. G. Soos
    • 1
  • S. Mazumdar
    • 1
  • T. T. P. Cheung
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA

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