Interactions among Estrogen, Prolactin and Luteinizing Hormone at the Level of Adenylyl Cyclase in the Corpus Luteum: Findings and Physiological Correlates

  • Sharon Day
  • Joel Abramowitz
  • Mary Hunzicker-Dunn
  • Lutz Birnbaumer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 112)


LH-stimulable adenylyl cyclase activity has been observed to fluctuate in rat and rabbit corpora lutea (CL) of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy (1, 2) in a manner that parallels progesterone output by these tissues (3, 4). However, the physiological significance of some of these fluctuations remains elusive, since LH is not the primary luteotropin throughout all stages of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy in rats or rabbits (5–9). LH has been shown to affect luteal steroidogenesis acutely (10, 11). It is thought to do so by interacting with a membrane bound receptor which when coupled to the adenylyl cyclase system results in elevation of intracellular cAMP and increased progesterone output (12). Other hormones such as estrogen and prolactin also modify progesterone output by the corpus luteum but apparently do so by some means other than changing intracellular levels of cAMP.


Adenylyl Cyclase Corpus Luteum Estrogen Treatment Serum Progesterone Corpus Luteum 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Day
    • 1
  • Joel Abramowitz
    • 1
  • Mary Hunzicker-Dunn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lutz Birnbaumer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicagoUSA

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