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Connotative Meaning and Averaged Evoked Potentials

  • Robert M. Chapman
Part of the The Downstate Series of Research in Psychiatry and Psychology book series (DSRPP, volume 2)

Abstract

The effects of two kinds of experimental manipulation of semantic meaning were studied in Evoked Potentials (EPs), brain responses recorded from scalp monitors. Both kinds of semantic manipulation were based on Osgood’s rating analyses which described three primary dimensions of connotative meaning: Evaluation, Potency, and Activity (E, P, and A). One kind of experimental variable was the semantic class of the stimulus word (E+, E-, P+, P-, A+, A-). The other kind of experimental variable was the semantic dimension of the rating scale (E, P, A) which the subject used to make semantic judgments about the stimulus words. These variables were experimentally combined in that for each trial the subject used a designated semantic scale to judge a specified stimulus word while brain activity was recorded. Using multivariate procedures, both stimulus word class and scale dimension effects on the EPs were found. Individual subject analyses demonstrated the generality of the results by showing successful discrimination of word classes and scale dimensions for each of the ten subjects analyzed separately.

Keywords

Word List Stimulus Word Semantic Dimension Scale Dimension Semantic Meaning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Chapman
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology Department and Center for Visual ScienceUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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