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The Use of Group Meetings with Cancer Patients and Their Families

  • Mary L. S. Vachon
  • W. Alan Lyall
  • Joy Rogers
  • Anton Formo
  • Karen Freedman
  • Jeanette Cochrane
  • Stanley J. J. Freeman
Part of the Sloan-Kettering Institute Cancer Series book series (SKICS)

Abstract

A diagnosis of cancer confronts the patient and his family with a major life crisis. With few exceptions, an extended period of uncertainty follows the initial treatment while all await the eventual outcome of the disease. Some authors have documented this period of uncertainty (1–3) but only a few attempts have been made to intervene in a systematic manner with groups of patients and family members to provide support and improve coping techniques during this period (4–7) Still less systematic research has been attempted with patients and family members who are living with the knowledge that the cancer is disseminated and therefore control of the disease is the best that can be hoped for. (8)

Keywords

Group Meeting Psychosocial Aspect Princess Margaret Hospital Inpatient Group Final Illness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary L. S. Vachon
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Alan Lyall
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joy Rogers
    • 1
  • Anton Formo
    • 1
  • Karen Freedman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeanette Cochrane
    • 1
  • Stanley J. J. Freeman
    • 1
  1. 1.Community Resources SectionClarke Institute of PsychiatryTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoCanada

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