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The Adenovirus-SV40 Hybrid Viruses

  • Cephas T. Patch
  • Arthur S. Levine
  • Andrew M. LewisJr.
Part of the Comprehensive Virology book series (CV)

Abstract

The adenovirus-simian virus 40 (Ad-SV40) hybrid viruses are stable viral recombinants which form in monkey kidney cells (MKC) coinfected with the simian papovavirus SV40 and a number of human adenovirus serotypes. The genomes of these viruses are composed mainly of Ad DNA (integrated with varying amounts of SV40 DNA) and are enclosed in capsids whose morphological and immunological properties are indistinguishable from those of the parent nonhybrid adenovirus. Studies of the Ad-SV40 hybrid viruses have made important contributions to a number of areas of molecular virology; previous reviews of these studies include those by Rapp (1973) and Lewis (1977).

Keywords

Human Embryonic Kidney Human Adenovirus Hybrid Molecule African Green Monkey Kidney Cell Hybrid Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cephas T. Patch
    • 1
  • Arthur S. Levine
    • 1
  • Andrew M. LewisJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Section on Infectious Disease Pediatric Oncology Branch National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Viral Diseases National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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