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The Infant as a Focus for Family Reciprocity

  • T. Berry Brazelton
  • Michael W. Yogman
  • Heidelise Als
  • Edward Tronick
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 2)

Abstract

The human infant, from birth onward, exhibits predictable behavioral patterns with an adult conspecific. Within the first few weeks, he establishes differentiated behavioral sets for interaction with objects and with persons (Brazelton, Koslowski, & Main, 1974).

Keywords

Joint State Mutual Orientation Expressive Modality Neutral Facial Expression Single Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Berry Brazelton
    • 1
  • Michael W. Yogman
    • 1
  • Heidelise Als
    • 1
  • Edward Tronick
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Development UnitChildren’s Hospital Medical CenterBostonUSA

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