Biomaterials pp 147-162 | Cite as

Soft Tissue Replacement I: Sutures, Skin, and Maxillofacial Implants

  • Joon Bu Park


The success of soft tissue implants has primarily been due to the development of synthetic polymers. This is mainly because the polymers can be tailored to match the physical and chemical properties of soft tissues. Polymers can be made into various physical forms such as liquid for filling spaces, fibers for suture materials, films for catheter balloons, knitted fabrics for blood vessel prostheses, and solid forms for cosmetic and weight-bearing applications.


Suture Material Breast Implant Artificial Skin Surgical Tape Catgut Suture 


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Further Reading

  1. A. H. Bulbulian, Facial Prosthetics, Charles C Thomas, Springfield, Ill., 1973.Google Scholar
  2. V. A. Chalian, J. B. Drane, and S. M. Standish, Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore, 1971.Google Scholar
  3. S. F. Hulbert, S. N. Levine, and D. D. Moyle (eds.), Prosthesis and Tissue: The Interface Problem, pp. 99–136, J. Wiley and Sons, New York, 1974.Google Scholar
  4. H. Lee and K. Neville, Handbook of Biomedical Plastics, chapters 4 and 13, Pasadena Technology Press, Pasadena, Calif., 1971.Google Scholar
  5. S. N. Levine (ed.), “Polymers and Tissue Adhesives,” in Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., Part IV, 146, p. 193, 1968.Google Scholar
  6. V. Mooney, S. A. Schwartz, A. M. Roth, and M. J. Gorniowsky, “Percutaneous Implant Devices,” Ann. Biomed. Eng., 5, 34, 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. G. D. Winger, “Epidermal Regeneration Studied in the Domestic Pig,” in Epidermal Wound Healing, chapter 4, ed. H. I. Maibach and D. T. Rovee, Year Book Medical Publishers, Chicago, 1972.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Bu Park
    • 1
  1. 1.Clemson UniversityClemsonUSA

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