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Children as Environmental Planners

  • Jill N. Nagy
  • John C. Baird
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 3)

Abstract

The importance of internal representations of a large-scale environment has long been recognized (Trowbridge, 1913), but only recently has the nature and use of such representations been the subject of intensive experimental study (for review, see Hart & Moore, 1973; Siegel & White, 1975). These reviews focus on issues raised within the context of environmental psychology. However, investigations of spatial knowledge also encompass concerns basic to the understanding of human memory and problem solving. The construction of internal, spatial arrays as mediators of semantic organization and logical inferences is under investigation in both children (Trabasso & Riley, 1973; Trabasso, Rilesy, & Wilson, 1975; Huttenlocher, 1967) and adults (Potts, 1972, 1975). It appears that in some instances a spatial dimension is added to information in order for certain relationships to be more easily perceived, remembered, or utilized. Likewise the current trend in data analysis involving scaling techniques highlights the usefulness of superimposing a spatial dimension onto information involving complex relationships.

Keywords

Planning Process Spatial Representation Structure Rule Ideal Space Planning Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill N. Nagy
    • 1
  • John C. Baird
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLoyola UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA

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