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Children’s Home Environments: Social and Cognitive Effects

  • Ross D. Parke
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 3)

Abstract

What is a home?

“Home the nursery of the infinite.”—W.E. Channing, Notebook: Children

“Home interprets heaven. Home is heaven for beginners.” —Charles Parkhurst, Sermons: The Perfect Place

“No place is more delightful than one’s own fireside.” —Cicero, Epistolae ad Familiares

Keywords

Cognitive Development Home Environment Social Class Difference Social Stimulation Family Tension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross D. Parke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of IllinoisChampaign-UrbanaUSA

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