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Genevan Theory and the Education of Exceptional Children

  • D. Kim Reid

Abstract

Interest of special educators in Genevan theory is growing, but few serious attempts have been made to approach the education of exceptional children from a Genevan perspective. Piaget’s concerns have been with the epistemic subject whose structures are relatively homogeneous. In addition, Genevan theory has focused on development, rather than the acquisition of information and skills. It is not surprising, therefore, that special educators have all but overlooked the potential value of Genevan theory to their work. In the hope of encouraging a narrowing of that gap, this chapter will examine Genevan theory as a suitable framework for the education of exceptional children, its relation to the predominant orientations in special education, research trends relating Genevan theory to special populations, and finally the implications of Genevan research and theory for the education of exceptional children.

Keywords

Moral Judgment Moral Conduct Learn Disability Mental Deficiency Retarded Child 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Kim Reid
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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