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State-of-the-Art Wave Prediction Methods and Data Requirements

  • Vincent J. Cardone
  • Duncan B. Ross
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 8)

Abstract

In the past decade, there has been a general shift in wave prediction methods from simple empirical techniques developed in the 1940’s to the application of numerical models based upon the spectral energy balance equation. Such models simulate the physical processes governing the growth of surface waves which have been identified as a result of extensive theoretical and experimental study of wave generation. The importance of nonlinear wave-wave interactions in wave generation has prompted the recent development of an alternate model context for wave prediction, which is based upon a parametric representation of the wave spectrum. This paper reviews the structure of state-of-the-art spectral and parametric methods and validation, and wave data requirements for further improvements in such methods.

Keywords

Wave Height Wind Field Significant Wave Height Wave Spectrum Ocean Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent J. Cardone
    • 1
  • Duncan B. Ross
    • 2
  1. 1.Oceanweather Inc.National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationUSA
  2. 2.Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationUSA

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