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Peptide and Neurotransmitter Receptors in the Brain: Regulation by Ions and Guanyl Nucleotides

  • Solomon H. Snyder
Chapter
Part of the Published Nobel Symposia book series (NOFS, volume 42)

Abstract

In recent years attention has focused on the localization of traditional peptide hormones in the brain. In several cases peptides, thought to be confined to the gastrointestinal tract, and associated glands and the pituitary, were reported to occur in the brain. Whether or not all gut peptide hormones exist in the brain as well is by no means clear. Interestingly, peptides first discovered in the brain, such as substance P and enkephalin, have subsequently been shown to occur also in the intestinal tract. Because of their localization in specific neuronal pathways, these peptides have been suggested as neurotransmitters. One way in which the brain peptides resemble conventional neurotransmitters lies in the properties of their receptor sites as defined in biochemical studies.

Keywords

Dopamine Receptor Adenylate Cyclase Divalent Cation Neurotransmitter Receptor Glycine Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Solomon H. Snyder
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Pharmacol.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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