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Biochemical Studies on X-Chromosome Activity in Preimplantation Mouse Embryos

  • Marilyn Monk
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 12)

Abstract

During early development of female (XX) eutherian mammals, one or the other of the X chromosomes is rendered inactive in all, or most, of the cells of the embryo. This differentiation of the X chromosomes is irreversible, and the adult female is a mosaic with respect to clones of cells with either the maternally-derived or paternally-derived X chromosome inactive. The timing of X-chromosome differentiation has been a subject of considerable interest. Cytogenetic evidence suggests that it occurs around the time of implantation, or at the late blastocyst stage (e.g., see Takagi 1974; Mukherjee 1976). However, other genetic evidence (Gardner and Lyon 1971) suggests that both X chromosomes are active at this stage, at least in the inner cell mass cells of the blastocyst. The subject of X-chromosome inactivation has been extensively reviewed (e.g., see Lyon 1968, 1972, 1974; Eicher 1970; Gartler and Andina 1976; and Monk 1978).

Keywords

Inner Cell Mass Dosage Compensation Preimplantation Embryo Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Preimplantation Mouse Embryo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn Monk
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Mammalian Development Unit, Wolfson HouseUniversity College LondonLondonEngland

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