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Punishment

  • J. B. Overmier
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

In the immediately preceding sections we have been concerned with the instrumental reward learning paradigm, such learning being characterized by the delivery of hedonically positive events contingent upon the occurrence of a specified response. We turn now to the punishment paradigm wherein the occurrence of a specified response results in the delivery of a hedonically negative, noxious event which typically decreases the probability of future occurrences of that response. Thus, the behavioral outcome of the punishment operation is usually the inverse of that of the reward operation. Thorndike (1913) captured this relationship in his statement of the symmetrical Law of Effect. With respect to punishment, he argued that whenever a response resulted in an annoying state of affairs this weakened the stimulus response association which led to that response

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Discriminative Stimulus Food Reward Conditioned Emotional Response Response Decrement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Overmier
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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