Reward Training: Extinction

  • M. E. Rashotte
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

A response established in reward training weakens following a downshift in the value of Sv (Chapter 7). It is not surprising, therefore, that complete elimination of Sv from the training situation also results in weakened responding. The procedure of eliminating Sv after the response has been established through training and the behavioral result of that procedure are both commonly termed extinction. For example, it might be said that “extinction began after four sessions of continuous reinforcement” (the procedure) or that “the response extinguished (i.e., weakened) very rapidly” (the result). In the latter case, it would also be common for the response to be described as having little “resistance to extinction.”

Keywords

Fatigue Assure Resis Hull Schiff 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Rashotte
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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