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Reward Training: Contrast Effects

  • M. E. Rashotte
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

Several important characteristics of reward training have been revealed by employing procedures in which animals are exposed to more than one value of the reward event. The present chapter reviews three of those procedures and the contrast effects they produce in instrumental performance. “Contrast effect” is a term borrowed from sensory psychology where it describes the fact that the perceived difference between two stimuli is exaggerated by the manner of their presentation. A contrast effect in reward training is characterized by performances which indicate that the influence of a given reward event is exaggerated by the nature of other reward events to which the animal is exposed. The procedures to be discussed here yield performances that have been designated successive-, simultaneous-, and behavioral-contrast effects. They have been an important stimulant for theoretical development.

Keywords

Contrast Effect Negative Contrast Multiple Schedule Positive Contrast Behavioral Contrast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Rashotte
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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