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Classical Conditioning: Contingency and Contiguity

  • V. M. LoLordo
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

The last chapter described the sorts of experiments that led Pavlov to his conception of the conditions which are necessary and sufficient for the conditioning of excitation and inhibition. This chapter will begin by placing the sorts of relationships between CS and UCS that Pavlov explored within a broader framework, one which should help the reader organize a large body of data, and which should suggest a variety of new experiments on classical conditioning.

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Classical Conditioning Conditioning Trial Animal Behavior Process Nictitate Membrane Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. M. LoLordo
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalhousie UniversityHalifax, Nova ScotiaCanada

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