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Classical Conditioning: The Pavlovian Perspective

  • Vincent M. LoLordo
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

Three treatments of an area of research called classical or Pavlovian conditioning will be presented in the next three chapters. The three treatments reflect three conceptual frameworks for organizing the experimental literature on classical conditioning. Each treatment reflects an increase in theoretical sophistication, though none replaces all the key concepts of earlier treatments with novel ones. Taken together, the three chapters should provide an historical account of our ways of thinking about classical conditioning, and of the interplay of method and theory in this area. In the first chapter, which outlines the Pavlovian perspective, a large number of terms will be introduced. It should be some consolation that, once these terms are understood, they will be very useful throughout these chapters.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Classical Conditioning Conditioned Inhibition Pavlovian Conditioning Conditioning Trial 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent M. LoLordo
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalhousie UniversityHalifax, Nova ScotiaCanada

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