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Constraints on Learning

  • Vincent M. LoLordo
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

Research on learning has concentrated on the search for general laws which transcend the specific choices of stimuli, responses, and reinforcers made by experimenters. Researchers have generally assumed that they could arbitrarily select the elements to be used in their classical conditioning and instrumental training experiments without markedly affecting the success of the experiments.

Keywords

Classical Conditioning Taste Aversion Animal Behavior Process Instrumental Response Differential Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent M. LoLordo
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalhousie UniversityHalifax, Nova ScotiaCanada

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