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Theories of Instrumental Learning

  • J. B. Overmier
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 19)

Abstract

We have now reviewed the learning that occurs under various applications of the three-term contingency of stimulus→response→ outcome stimuli, i.e., the instrumental reward, escape, punishment, and avoidance paradigms. Each has proved to produce far more complex phenomena than one might have naively expected. The questions that shall interest us here in a summary fashion are: “What is learned?” and “How?” These are the perennial questions in the psychology of learning.

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Classical Conditioning Avoidance Response Instrumental Response Reward Magnitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Overmier
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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