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The Fabrication of Dense Nitrogen Ceramics

  • K. H. Jack
Part of the Materials Science Research book series (MSR, volume 11)

Abstract

In fabricating nitrogen ceramics the objective is to produce a shaped component with high strength, oxidation resistance, negligible creep and good thermal shock properties all at temperatures above 1400°C. Densification, whether by hot-pressing or by pressureless sintering, requires an additive the function of which is to provide conditions for liquid-phase sintering. Thus, magnesium oxide reacts with the silica that is always present as a surface layer on the nitride powder to give what was at first thought 1 to be a liquid near the MgSiO3-SiO2 eutectic composition and which on cooling gives a low softening-temperature glass. Impurities lower the glass viscosity and so the strength and creep resistance of the high-density, hot-pressed product decrease rapidly above 1000°C. It is now well-established that the liquid phase is an oxynitride. Indeed, bulk samples of nitrogen-containing glasses in the Mg-Si-O-N and Mg-Si-Al-O-N systems 2 and in the corresponding yttrium systems have been prepared.

Keywords

Boron Nitride Silicon Nitride Oxidation Resistance Surface Silica Pressureless Sinter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Jack
    • 1
  1. 1.Crystallography LaboratoryThe University of Newcastle upon TyneUK

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