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Fluorescence Quantitation of S-IgA in Parotid Saliva and of S-IgA Bound to Oral Microorganisms

  • Jerry J. Pollock
  • Thomas F. McNamara
  • Joan M. Zuckerman
  • Hannah Goodman-Bicker
  • Howard Madlin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 107)

Abstract

Quantitation of secretory IgA (s-IgA) in parotid saliva (1), whole saliva (2,3) and in other exocrine secretions (4) is generally performed by radial immunodiffusion. Although simple and quantitative, this method does not readily lend itself to the determination of s-IgA bound to oral microorganisms. Two techniques quantitating the binding of parotid salivary s-IgA to Streptococcus mutans, a modified ELISA assay (5) and an agglutinin assay (6), have recently been published. The aim of the present work was to develop fluorescence methods to quantitate the concentration of s-IgA in parotid saliva and the percentage of parotid s-IgA bound to a specific oral microorganism. Fluorescence assays have the advantage of high sensitivity and moreover permit direct visualization of binding by fluorescence microscopy.

Keywords

Radial Immunodiffusion Fluorescence Quantitation Parotid Saliva Oral Microorganism Precipitin Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry J. Pollock
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thomas F. McNamara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joan M. Zuckerman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hannah Goodman-Bicker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard Madlin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Oral Biology and PathologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Farrand Optical Co., Inc.ValhallaUSA

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