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Immunologic Aspects of Human Colostrum and Milk: Interaction with the Intestinal Immunity of the Neonate

  • S. S. Ogra
  • D. I. Weintraub
  • P. L. Ogra
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 107)

Abstract

Human colostrum and milk contains T and B lymphocytes, macrophages and the major classes of immunoglobulins (1). The bulk of the immunoglobulins in colostrum and milk belong to the secretory (11S) IgA class (2,3). It has been suggested that the secretory IgA antibody activity found in the mammary glands and in colostrum is largely derived from the gut associated lymphoid tissue (4). Little or no information is available regarding the distribution of antibody producing cells and the levels of immunoglobulins in colostrum and milk at various times after onset of lactation. Fragmentary data are available on T-lymphocyte function and in vitro correlates of cell-mediated immunity in colostrum and milk (1,4). Little is known about the intestinal absorption of the immunoglobulins and cellular components in colostrum.

Keywords

Mammary Gland Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Breast Feeding Roswell Park Memorial Institute Purify Protein Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. S. Ogra
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. I. Weintraub
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. L. Ogra
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of MedicineState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious Disease and VirologyChildren’s HospitalBuffaloUSA

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