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The Nutritive Value of Faba Beans and Low Glucosinolate Rapeseed Meal for Swine

  • F. X. Aherne
  • A. J. Lewis
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 105)

Abstract

Faba beans may be effectively used as a partial replacement for other protein supplements in swine diets. Breeding swine appear to be particularly sensitive to the level of faba beans in their diets. The lack of a response to autoclaving faba beans suggests that the trypsin inhibitor level and condensed tannin content of faba beans do not significantly influence the performance of growing-finishing swine. Supplementation of diets containing faba beans with lysine and/or methionine has not improved pig performance.

The scientific selection and commercial production of low glucosinolate varieties of rape constitutes a major advance for swine nutrition. All swine experiments that have compared low glucosinolate rapeseed meal with regular rapeseed meal have demonstrated the superiority of the low glucosinolate material as a protein source. Substantially larger proportions of the low glucosinolate material may be fed to all classes of swine without any significant depression in performance.

Keywords

Soybean Meal Faba Bean Average Daily Gain Vicia Faba Trypsin Inhibitor Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. X. Aherne
    • 1
  • A. J. Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Animal ScienceUniversity of AlbertaAlbertaCanada

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